Eating Japanese food is probably one of the most interesting, pleasurable and satisfying dining experience you can ever have. When Japanese food is served on your table, you can expect to see a feast of colors, an appetizing aroma and a scrumptious and filling recipe. Eating, however, is just one of the parts of the total Japanese food experience.

Food preparation is where everything starts. Since Japanese food usually appears to be a culinary masterpiece when served, it of course is expected that careful preparation 低卡食物 has been done to make such possible.

Sushi is one of the most common favorite Japanese foods. Its ingredients are also usually available even in common grocery stores. You need sushi rice, ginger, sushi-su, wasabi, soy sauce, dried seaweed wrap or sushi nori, tuna or salmon, miso soup, cucumber, avocado, crabsticks and sesame seed. You would also need a rolling mat to form these ingredients into a roll, ready to be cut into the eye-candy bite-size pieces.

The ingredients which are required to be cooked, must of course be cooked. But the general idea is that these ingredients are just diced and set on the seaweed wrap and then rolled into a sushi log using the rolling mat. The sesame seed, the oil and the soy sauce are just for garnish.

Generally, sushi is a favorite Japanese food. It is almost easy to prepare unless you choose to use very unique ingredients such as ikura (salmon roe) or uni (sea urchin roe). Usually, the basic ingredients of a sushi is used only that the nori is fashioned to have an excess, cup-like formation towards the end. This “cup” then serves as “housing” for the uni or ikura used. You must remember though that if you choose to utilize these ingredients in your recipe, you must serve your product immediately as the nori would easily turn soggy because of the wet, paste-like texture of the roe.